Environmental impacts

Caverion’s energy consumption and CO2 emissions in 2017−2015

Direct fuel consumption, GWh

2017

2016

2015

Petrol

10.5

21.2

11.6

Diesel

86.4

81.0

113.1

Light fuel oil

2.2

2.4

2.7

Natural gas

1.1

0.9

1.2

Liquefied petroleum gas

2.2

2.9

2.0

Total

102.4

105.4

128.6


Consumption of indirect energy sources, GWh

2017 2016 2015

Electricity

26.7

27.7

34.3

District heat

16.3

15.9

15.4

Geothermal 
0.09 0.21  0.08 
Total 
42.9  43.9  49.7 


Scope 1 emissions from direct fuel consumption, tonnes

2017 2016 2015

CO₂emissions, petrol

2,648.9

6,360.1

3,349.3

CO₂emissions, diesel

23,052.6

21,605.2

30,063.0

CO₂emissions, light fuel oil

581.4

647.1

732.5

CO₂emissions, natural gas

211.5

165.9

220.5

CO₂emissions,LPG

513.2

677.3

471.5

Total 
 27,007.6 29,455.7  34,836.9 

 

Scope 2 emissions from indirect energy sources, tonnes

2017 2016 2015

CO₂emissions, electricity

8,961.3

9,542.8

11,925.6

CO₂emissions, district heat

2,709.4

2,406.8

2,247.3

CO₂emissions, geothermal
 11.3 25.4  10.2 
Total
11,682.0  11,975.0  14,183.1 
 

     

Scope 1 & 2 CO2 emissions, tonnes 

38,689.6

41,431.9

49,020.0

 

Intensity ratios

2017 2016 2015

Direct and indirect tCO₂emissions/revenue (EURm)

17.0

17.5

20.1

Energy intensity       
total GWh//revenue (EURm)

0.0189

0.0186

0.0204


The figures concerning energy consumption and emission calculations cover the entire business operations of Caverion Group. The calculations are mainly based on real consumption data. In some countries total consumption has been estimated, if exact data is available for only some of the consumption.

Geothermal emission factors are restated and therefore 2016 and 2015 differ from earlier published figures.

Environmental risks


Caverion’s business does not involve significant environmental risks. Our business, which consists of the project deliveries of technical systems and their service and maintenance, consumes minor amounts of non-renewable natural resources and energy. The majority of our operations’ environmental impact relates to localised noise, dust or vapours. In addition, our operations generate waste which we recycle and dispose of in the appropriate manner.


Fleet emissions and economic driving


The emissions generated by our own operations are mainly due to the fuel consumption of our service cars. For the transport of both material and people, we use logistical solutions that help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental aspects are also considered in the selection of company cars.

Caverion’s target is to utilise logistical solutions that help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. As an example, environmental aspects are considered in the selection of company cars. Caverion mostly uses diesel cars in its service and business car fleet. In addition, gas and full electric business cars are used particularly in Caverion Sweden. Caverion continuously follows the development of technology and is open to consider hybrid and electric cars for wider use in the future. As another example, Caverion Finland offered the possibility to test electric and hybrid cars for business use in 2017.

Caverion’s divisions have their own service and business car policies, requirements and restrictions. For service vehicles the limit is between 150-201 gCO2/km, depending on the country, and for business cars the limit is between 128-150 gCO2/km. The total number of Caverion’s service and business cars decreased from 2016 to 2017, especially in Norway and Sweden. The reduction is partly due to efficiency measures carried out in the business.
 
An efficient planning of routes and an economical way of driving are important focus areas to Caverion. In 2017, an environmentally friendly driver campaign was rolled out both in both Norway and Denmark, which included smart route planning and ecological driving trainings. The use of mobile solutions in field work has also been increased. This contributes to the reduction of unnecessary driving.

Caverion continuously follows legislation changes in the EU area. The proposed bonus-malus system of Sweden, as an example, would create a monetary incentive to renew the vehicle fleet in order to meet more ambitious emission limits. Otherwise the result would be a higher tax for vehicles with high emissions. Furthermore, an increasing amount of diesel restrictions in city areas could have an effect on Caverion’s fleet in the future. Caverion needs to take this into consideration as an increasing amount of its fuel consumption is diesel fuel. In 2017, 95 percent of Caverion’s fleet fuel consumption was diesel fuel.